Realtime Passage to Chile #02

Midnight watch: all good so far – light winds, small waves both against us. Not terrible, just a little bit bouncy as we are going slow, its a long ways and lets not get too beat up on the first night out.
Pretty good day, got an early-ish start. About an hour late as I wanted to change the fuel filters while in the protection of the bay, especially after seeing what showed up in the ‘baja filter’ we used to screen the jerry can fuel we loaded up on in the Galapagos. Water and sludge. That took about an hour so we got started around 8:30.
One of the boats we know from Panama came in the night before we left, and anchored close enough to say hello and good bye at the same time. Our paths will cross again as they will also head to Easter Island after Galapagos.
Christine & Sally made some yummy banana muffins for breakfast while Ron helped me with the fuel filters.
First couple of hours was 180 degrees from where we wanted to go, we had to get clear of the island before we could tack over to get on course.
Once on course we dropped the fishing lines in, nothing much for a long while but then a large Wahoo took off running. Could already taste dinner, but then as he was leaping out of the water the swivel became the weak link and dinner said, see you later. Not to be out done a sneaky Marlin came in close with lightning speed and snatched the ‘teaser’ right up next to the boat, breaking the 200lb test line like it was sewing thread. So far, fish: 2 – us: zero. Its a long way so we will keep trying.
Pressure cooker Carnitas for dinner, its almost like being in Austin with a little Tex-Mex to wind down the day.
As I sat down to type an update, the wind, like on cue picks up to 20k from the steady 12k we were having – the dark cloud that obscures the stars is no doubt the reason, but the increase in wind also pushed top boat speed up to 9.9kn for the past 30 minutes. And just like that we are back to 10knots of wind and slow going.
Started with 1765 miles till the destination, 1675 miles to go if we were a crow.
On 12/14/2018 @ 7:45 AM Our position: 01°58.69’S, 088°33.01’W Traveling 7.9 heading 135T
Google says we are here www.google.com/maps/place/-1.97817,-88.55017
At 12/14/2018 @ 7:45 AM Our position: 01°58.69’S, 088°33.01’W Traveling 7.9 heading 135T
Google says we are here www.google.com/maps/place/-1.97817,-88.55017

Realtime Passage to Chile #01

We are underway, looking at least a 2 weeks at sea, and going into the wind. Gonna be a long one. Not quite as far as the atlantic crossing but will be close by the time we factor in the wind direction and waves that are pushing against out direction its gonna be a while before we find internet again.
Cheers, all is good so far.. course its only been 6 miles.
Lots of miles to go, only about 1765 nautical miles as the crow flies.
On 12/13/2018 @ 3:20 PM Our position: 00°53.62’S, 089°41.22’W Traveling 6.9 heading 255T
Google says we are here www.google.com/maps/place/-0.89367,-89.68700
At 12/13/2018 @ 3:20 PM Our position: 00°53.62’S, 089°41.22’W Traveling 6.9 heading 255T
Google says we are here www.google.com/maps/place/-0.89367,-89.68700

Love my varnished entryway

Spa Time to Beat the Boatyard Blues

Boatyard blues effect Matt and I as well as our boat.  I think it’s a necessary evil, but it takes its toll.  While we are waiting for repairs to be completed, we decided to beautify Sugar Shack.

Five years ago, we painted our dinghy davits that were showing some wear and tear.  Then 2 years ago, we painted the mast, boom, and bow sprit while we were in St. Maarten.  We have wanted to paint our bimini support poles for some time now, but thought that the best way to do it was to remove our bimini which was just too big of a job for the two of us to tackle on our own.

BIMINI SUPPORTS

The support poles get a lot of rubbing from our jib sheets and the paint has just worn down over the last 18 years.  So, since she is on the hard and the bimini is raised to thread the solar panels wires, we decided to get the job done.  We hired Bristol Marine to do several projects for us.

They masked off all areas, sanded and removed all flaking paint and glue residue, prepared metal with acid wash Alumiprep 33, rolled/brushed Zinchromate Yellow, Primer, applied Epoxy Primer White, sanded, and then painted by brush, 2 coats of Stark White AwlGrip (should have been cloud white, but they are close enough).

Bimini Supports Getting Some Love

Before photos of Bimini Supports

Photos below below show bimini supports with primer (lovely green), the cockpit table is gone (being sanded) and the entryway is being varnished.

Bimini Supports with Primer

Bimini Supports with Primer

We had to have the team redo some pieces because they were not done to our satisfaction.  But to Ben’s credit, they re-sanded and re-painted until we were happy.

Here are some shots where there was paint drip, low paint coverage, yellow primer on the bimini track, and bubbles in the varnish.  Matt even got in on the action to show them how it he wanted it done (and they call me the “perfectionist”)

Few places to fix on the bimini supports

Few places to fix on the bimini supports

And now it is simply smooth and lovely:

Bimini Supports Completed

Bimini Supports Completed

ENTRYWAY

Back in 2013, we had “Vision” varnish our entryway in St. Lucia.  It has had many a feet stomp across wearing it down and it was time to refresh it.  After all it is the first thing you see as you enter our dwelling.

This process requires a lot of masking as the old varnish is stripped way with a heat gun and scraper.  Haner, our worker said that it is a bit more difficult as we have a thin layer of varnish.  He has to be very gentle as not to overheat or burn the natural wood while removing the varnish.  If there was a thick coat, he could make better use of the heat gun.

The photo on the right shows where he removed some varnish and then shows the depleted varnish.

Repairing the Varnish on the Entryway

Repairing the Varnish on the Entryway

Once all of the old varnish was removed, they block sanded it, cleaned, applied yellow primer AwlWood and 10 coats of gloss (while sanding in between coats).

Entryway Completed and looking marvelous.

Entryway Half Way Mark

Entryway Half Way Mark

COCKPIT TABLE

Our cockpit table is protected with a wood stain, but it tends to need updating every other month.  The sun fades the stain and exposes the wood which could cause damage.  We decided to have the team sand the table and apply Semco Oil Natural Color to see if this will last a bit longer.

We really liked the look of the entryway at the half way mark and asked Bristol what the cost would be to do the same treatment to the cockpit table.  Unfortunately, it was way out of our budget at $2500 so we opted to go back to the Semco Oil Natural Color.

This is a photo of the table using StarBrite Stain. It actually is not really bad now, with the exception of the center edge where the flaps leave exposed surface.

Before Photo: Cockpit Table StarBrite Stain

Before Photo: Cockpit Table StarBrite Stain

The cockpit table all sanded and ready for Simco Oil

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All ready to host dinner parties:  Super pretty!

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TEAK ENGINE HATCH COVERS

Both the Port and Starboard Engine Teak is coming up off the cover.  We decided to remove them so we could properly glue them down.  It was so bad that when it rained it leaked a little bit into the engine room – and we can’t have a wet engine room.

Photo shows corner teak coming up and 2nd photo is Matt stepping on it and you can see the water seeping out.

Engine Teak Coming Up on Cover

Engine Teak Coming Up on Cover

Bristol sanded both hatches, so now we need to sand down the other teak steps on each sugar scoop before sealing with Star Brite.

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The boatyard blues are always made better when your home looks good. It’s a slow process, but soon Sugar Shack will shake off her boatyard blues and be back in the water.  Who said that the boatyard blues can’t be productive?

BEFORE AND AFTER SHOTS:

Here are some before and after shots of the interior cabin during work and after the boat has been put back together.

Before and After forward cabin and main salon

Before and After forward cabin and main salon

Main or master cabin

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Master cabin head (bathroom)

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Aft cabin / office:

After cabin office before and after.

After cabin office before and after.