Tag Archives: gambiers archipelago

Sugar Shack in Totegegie

Graveyard: Island’s Windward Side

The wind shifted and forced us to move to a more protected anchorage near Totegegie. This sweet, skinny island is where the only airport is located in Gambiers.  It is a long, slender island with the leeward side in the lagoon and the windward side facing the ocean.  Most islands with a “windward” side facing the ocean are breeding grounds for a graveyard. What do I mean by that?

The ocean carries all sorts of things that are dumped or discarded by humans.  It is no fault of the ocean, but typically that stuff will land on an island that faces the ocean.  Totegegie’s windward side is no exception.  The photo below is a snapshot from our Navionics app which shows Totegegie.  The bottom left side is the lagoon side, the red arrow is Sugar Shack, and the top right is the Pacific Ocean.

Totegegie Location

Totegegie Location

The lagoon looks unattractive because the chart shows all the coral heads (bommies), depth, and channel markers.  But in reality, this is what the lagoon looks like in front of Totegegie.

Sugar Shack in Totegegie

Sugar Shack in Totegegie

Technically, we are not supposed to partake in any water activities which include swimming, SUPing, kayaking, etc… during the quarantine period.  In fact, we are not technically supposed to move the boat within the lagoon to other anchorages either.  However, the authorities have allowed us to move the boat to accommodate the shifting winds in order to keep the boat safe. 

Breaking the Law

We have been going stir crazy staying on our boat for the past 11 days and needed to stretch our legs.  So, we were naughty!  We blew up our paddle boards and went to shore.  Since the airport is closed on this uninhabited island — maybe it is not terribly illegal. 

We tied the boards to a tree and exercised our right to move our legs.

Parking spot for the SUPs

Parking spot for the SUPs

We walked up a little inlet that becomes a small river during high tide and then dries out during low tide.

High and Low Tide

High and Low Tide

The Graveyards

We encountered several different “graveyards” on the windward side.  Using the descriptor “graveyard” is sad and gloomy, but so was the site we encountered on the windward side of the island.

The Boat Graveyard

First, the steel graveyard.  The French Military used this area as a dumping ground many years ago.  They dumped tons of steel and did not account for the eroding shore.  Now the steel is all exposed and hiding in pain sight. Lots and lots of steel parts, poles, and pieces were scattered along the coast.  So very sad.

Old steel uncovered on shore

Old steel uncovered on shore

The Fishing Trap Graveyard

The next graveyard was full of fishing beacons and traps.  The Chinese use these large fishing contraptions and beacons. The locals use rods and reels.  These bad fishermen build the large fishing traps using bamboo and string.  Attached to the float is a beacon which allows the fisherman to find the trap at a later date.  They attract fish by tying plastic bags full of food to the bamboo and they let the trap float in the ocean (see the center photo with the bags still attached).  This is equivalent to deer hunting from a blind – not a sport!

Parts to Fishing Traps

Parts to Fishing Traps

The beacons seem to detach themselves from the traps and liter the beach as well.  We found three beacons in a mile stretch of shoreline.

Old fishing beacons

Old fishing beacons

The Trash Graveyard

As you can imagine, there is lots of trash, especially plastic on the windward side of the island.  We unfortunately do not have space to store the trash on the boat, otherwise we would have collected it.  All I could do was toss it further up shore to prevent it from being swept back into the sea.

Windward side with trash

Windward side with trash

The Animal Graveyard

Lots lobster shells laying around. Hopefully, it is just their shell after they shed them and not the death of the tasty lobsters.  We came across a perfectly intact crab with his 10 legs and eyes sitting on a rock.  Then a few feet away were a gaggle of crabs feasting on a dead bird.

Dead animals

Dead animals

Our walk on the windward side led us toward the airport over lots of dead, broken coral and rocks.  We had a few small patches of sand, but for the most part it was a rocky shoreline.

Shoreline on windward side

Shoreline on windward side

The Airport Graveyard

We finally made it to the airport!  It was not that far, but it took us awhile to navigate the uneven ground.  Me posing near the wind sock at the top photo.  An eerily empty airport and Matt walking along the “road” that runs parallel to the runway.

Airport on Totegegie

Airport on Totegegie

I had always wanted to walk down a runway.  Why?  Who knows?  Just a silly thing really.  But I loved it!  Maybe because I am a law abiding citizen and this was illegal – or maybe the pending danger of a rogue plane flying in??

Runway walking

Runway walking

We enjoyed a lazy day after we got back to the boat.  A little sunbathing and a few small boat projects.  Here is our view of Totegegie during our quarantine.

This is the inlet we walked up to get to the windward side of the island.

High and Low Tide

High and Low Tide

Sailboats return to Rikitea

Quarantined in French Polynesia

Covid 19 aka the corona virus.  French Polynesia immediately put strong measures in place to reduce the impact of the pandemic in the region.  Effective as of 11 March, all international flights and cruise ships were prohibited from entering FP waters.  All inter-island travel was forbidden (by sea or air) and a curfew was put into place.  On 21 March, the entire population was quarantined (until 4 April). 

Normally, I don’t put dates on posts because our posts don’t go live for 4-6 weeks after they were written.  The reason we do that is to ensure our posts go live every Tuesday and Thursday (even if we do not have internet access).  But this situation is different and dates are required to give you an idea of timing.

I know many of you, if not all of you are sick and tired of hearing about the corona virus and being quarantined.  If that is the case, feel free to skip this post.  However, if you are interested in learning how French Polynesia, a third world country, spread across thousands of miles, handled this pandemic, read on.

Full disclosure:  We do not read or understand French so I am sure there is a lot we did not hear about, read about, or learn from others.  This is just what we discovered as tourists in French Polynesia.  In addition, to our lack of understanding of the main language, we are also without internet.  We are located in the far archipelago called the Gambiers (the southernmost islands of French Polynesia).  In addition, we have not even been staying near the main village within the Gambiers.  We’ve been hiding in the remote islands away from the main land which are mostly uninhabited.

First Week – Early march

The first case in French Polynesia was a government official who traveled from France back to Tahiti in early March.  Within a week 2 more cases were announced.  And the rumors start flying around.  Well, I shouldn’t say “rumors” as much as mis-information.  It wasn’t people being malicious at all – just spreading information that may or may not apply to us here in FP. Some people assumed that French rules would apply here, but that was not always the case.

Second Week

Chaos started by the second week of March.  Smaller islands started closing (The Cook Islands and Galapagos) and the word on the street was that non-residents were going to be repatriated.   Other countries were requiring two-week self-quarantine prior to entering (New Zealand and Australia).

Before the virus, our plan was to head to New Zealand in July via The Cook Islands, Tonga, Fiji.  With the smaller islands closed to us it would make an incredibly long and tedious voyage of over 2500 nm.  

Cruisers were posting on the French Polynesia Cruisers Facebook Group (which is a group I started by the way – because you know, I rock 😊)  All non-residents were being repatriated (sent back to their home).  Guests on shore being asked to leave, flights were being cancelled, and more and more cases were popping up.  The FP government did not know what to do with pleasure vessels.  There were not enough places to leave our vessels and most did not have a home to return to (aka Matt and I).

French Poly cruisers stared a WhatsApp group to keep everyone informed on the status of cases in FP and around the world.  WhatsApp is a unique app that allows text communications with very little bandwidth.  So, in most cases we could get WhatsApp texts when we could not get anything else.

Third Week

By the third week in March all hell broke loose.   The FP government sent all FP locals back to their home island.  This is huge as many students’ study in Tahiti and many people work in other islands, trading, shopping etc…  Over 150 students and adults were returned back to the Gambiers.  In my opinion these are the ones that are most at risk for bringing the virus to the Gambiers.  They were in Tahiti where most of the cases were found.

Once all locals were returned home, they shut down all inter-island travel.  The land-based tourists had to get on one of 6 flights back to the U.S. or one of three flights back to Europe.  Then all flights ceased in and out of FP at the end of the week.  No cruiser is allowed to travel between archipelagos and in fact asked to “stay put at their island.”   We were quarantined and stuck in paradise.

Residents Repatriated to their Home Islands

We had front row seats to the last group of locals to come back to the Gambiers.  They are offloaded from a ferry on to shore using all sorts of precautions. Everyone wears gloves and masks (on-board and shore).

Residents return to Gambier during pandemic

Residents return to Gambier during pandemic

The dock is low and it is close to high tide so tables were set up to hold the luggage as passengers disembarked. I would have liked to see them taking temperatures before sending them home, but maybe that is too much to ask.  People from other islands come in pangas to pick up their guests and take them back to outer islands.

Passengers disembark

Passengers disembark

Once everyone disembarked from the ferry, they washed it down, inside and out.

Disinfecting the boat

Disinfecting the boat

Quarantined in Gambier.  A two-week lock down, self-quarantine was put into place where everyone, on land and sea, were required to stay at home (or on their boat) for 15 days.  Locals could go outside to work (if you work in a market, bank, or medical facility).  In addition, locals could only step outside to get food, fuel or medical care and only if it was within a 2-kilometer radius of their home.  

Return to the Mainland for the Supply Ship

We are so remote that all of the food and supplies have to come on a supply ship every 3-4 weeks.  Only some local fruit and eggs are grown on the main island in the Gambiers. 

The supply ship arrived while we were quarantined and it was pure chaos.  We had ordered (3) 200-liters of diesel to share between 2 other boats and were only able to get (1) 200-liter barrel.  Primarily because they wouldn’t allow us on shore until after 5p and curfew was 8p so we just did not have time to transfer the fuel.  All the pleasure boats in Gambiers converge in Rikitea to meet the supply ship.

Sailboats return to Rikitea

Sailboats return to Rikitea

The next day, we did go to shore at 0700 to procure some fresh veg and frozen goods.  Armed with my mask and gloves, I got in line behind 3 other locals.  They were allowing 4 people in the market at one time.  

Masked up to get provisions

Masked up to get provisions

Cruisers may go to shore if they ask permission first and then they “may” be escorted by the police.  We are only allowed to go to shore for food, fuel, or medical care.  With prior approval from the police, one person may go ashore at a time and only for an hour at a time.  In addition, the person ashore has to carry a govt form stating their business for being on shore and the date and time. 

Boats Arriving Despite the Country’s Closure

Any new boats arriving are being sent to Tahiti, regardless of their original destination.  Once in Tahiti, they will be allowed to refuel, provision, and do minor repairs and then asked to leave.

This was horrible news to the cruising community as it is the Pacific Passage time.  What does that mean?  It means hundreds if not thousands of boats that have prepared to cross the Pacific will be rerouted, turned away or unable to come.  It takes many, many months to prepare for a crossing of this magnitude.  Now, their choice will be to stay where they are (Mexico, Panama, U.S., Chile) and wait until next season (next year) which can be troublesome organizing visas.  Go to Mexico which seems to be the only open country, or go home.  So sad.

Many cruisers complained because they had been quarantined on their boat during their long passage from other countries (between 14-30 days), but FP wanted them to be quarantined where they could monitor them for an additional two weeks.  Their country, their rules.

Restrictions Get Tighter

A cruiser friend of mine had made a few masks and generously gave me one.  Yeah, as I did not have any medical masks.

Even being quarantined on our boat, it is still breath taking here.  A sunrise in Rikitea, Mangareva (mainland Gambiers):

Sunrise surprises with its brillance

Sunrise surprises with its brillance

On 28 March, the government announced an extension of the quarantine to 15 April.  They also made the rules stricter including no swimming or water-sports.  Kind of hard for boaters as we have to be in the water to check through hulls, clean the bottom, monitor maintenance, etc…  They made exceptions for us that we can do these maintenance things as long as we are not near the local population (near their shores).  In addition, they implemented a curfew of 2000-0500 and anyone out during those hours will be fined 160,000 xpf ($160).

As of 3 April, there are 37 cases of Covid-19 in FP.  One in Rangiroa (Tuamotus), three in Mo’orea and the rest in Tahiti.  They recently received a huge shipment of tests and are planning on testing the general population in Tahiti and Mo’orea only.  It has been 4 days since a new case has been confirmed.  There are zero cases confirmed in the Gambiers.

What Has Sugar Shack Done

We have anchored away from the mainland off of uninhabited islands.  For the most part we have been miles away from other people for the first 12-14 days.  Another boat called HooDoo with a lovely, young American couple came to anchor about .5 miles away from us.  They were under passage for 23 days (essentially their own quarantine) and came here to be quarantined to their boat for an additional 14 days.  We felt comfortable being around them as they have not been exposed to other people for 6 weeks.

Being far away from locals and the authorities, we felt comfortable pushing the line a little.  We did jump in the water, swam a little, cleaned the bottom of the boat and did some underwater projects.  We read a lot, worked on puzzles (on devices), watched movies and worked on boat projects. 

Loosening of the Quarantine Restrictions

The quarantine is lifted after five weeks of solitary confinement on the boat.  The FP government loosened the quarantine restrictions in the outer archipelagos (not in Tahiti and Mo’orea where the virus is located).  We are located in the Gambiers which is furthest archipelago from the Societies where Tahiti and Mo’orea are located.  We have not had any confirmed cases, but then again, we have not issued one test.

In the outer archipelagos we are allowed to travel within the archipelago (to one of the 12 islands) but we cannot leave the Gambiers archipelago.  The eateries open for take-out, the markets are open for regular hours, and we can visit with other people in groups of 6 or less, while maintaining 6’ social distancing.  However, there is still a curfew from 2000-0500 and liquor is not being sold (only beer and wine Mon-Fri 0800-1600).

Little More Freedom

A month later (7 May), we have a little more freedom.  The eateries are now open (if they wish) and the curfew has been lifted.  We are still asked to maintain social distancing and have been asked to refrain from having large social gatherings.

The Last Bit of Freedom

Now, if we could only get permission to travel between the archipelagos!  

We are Free

On 21 May the FP government allowed pleasure vessels that have already cleared into the country to travel between archipelagos.  Great news.  The only problem is the local gendarmerie in the Gambiers are stating that we cannot leave until the 29th of May.  Not really a hardship as the weather is not good for a 4-day passage.  So, we wait…but we are free!

Being quarantined in the Gambiers was the best place to be!

Beautiful Sunset behind the dock at Hao

A Putt Putt Passage to Hao

It’s like tearing a band right off – do it quickly so it stings less. After a leisure morning of boat yoga, we said “see ya again” to our friends and began our passage toward Hao.  It is only about 450 nm and should technically only take us 3.5 days if the winds were favorable.  However, the weather was predicted to be very light winds which would extend our passage another 1-1.5 days.

It started out as a really beautiful day, 7-8 knots of wind filling our full main and jib.  We don’t often fly with full sails so when we do it is a truly appreciated.  We put out the fishing rods and settled in at an easy 5 knots of boat speed.

However, we completely lost our wind the next day.  We had glass seas so calm we could see our reflection.  It was a true mirror image.  The photo below was taken while we were under way even though it looks like we are at anchor!

Passage to Hao - Calm Seas

Passage to Hao – Calm Seas

We enjoyed several beautiful sunsets and a full moon each night.  It was so fabulous to wake up for the night shift to a bright and beautiful sky.  You could still see all the stars, but Mr. Moon lit our way.

The next day the wind came back enough for us to raise a sail and shut down the engine for several hours.  Saving a little diesel.  Sweet.  But our last day we ended up motoring the entire day and night.  We did slow down on our last night to time our arrival at sunrise and at slack tide (will explain “slack” tide below).

Hao in the Tuamotus

The image below shows the entire atoll of Hao.  The green circle indicates the pass and the arrow indicates the village.  As you can see, the island is long and skinny with the airport being on the northern end.

The atoll of Hao in the Tuamotus

The atoll of Hao in the Tuamotus

Pass to Hao

The Tuamotus are famous for their “tricky” passes into the atolls and the many bombies (coral heads). All of the islands in the Tuamotu Archipelago are “atolls” and the atolls each have a pass to enter into their lagoons.  An atoll is a ring shaped reef with a lagoon in the middle. The pass to Hao is well marked and fairly wide.  However, you have to enter at slack tide.

“Slack” tide occurs when the ocean is the same level as the lagoon inside the atoll.  That can occur between 1-4 hours before or after high or low tide.  Each pass at each atoll is different. If you enter at the wrong time you can have up to a 20kt current pushing out the wrong way.  If you time it right it will either be 0 or it will be a gentle 3kts pushing you in the direction you want to go.  We thought slack tide was between high and low tide (we had no internet to look it up).  We were lucky though.  When we entered at sunrise, there was only a 3kt current against us.

This is a photo of outgoing tide against a 4 meter marker.  This was probably a 3kt current.

Marker at the Hao Pass with a "slight" current

Marker at the Hao Pass with a “slight” current

With both engines running at 1800 RPM we were traveling about 4.5 kts as we approached the entrance.  When we hit the current, we dropped down to 1 kt of forward motion.  Most boats can only travel between 5-7 kts (on average) so if your current going against you is stronger than that, you will never make the entrance.  We got lucky.  There was a smaller monohulls that had to wait 3 days to get into the lagoon as she could not go faster than the tide.

Entering the Hao Passage at Sunrise

Entering the Hao Passage at Sunrise

The Anchorage at Hao

There is an abandoned marina (previously used by the French Navy) that is often used as a free mooring for cruisers.  When we arrived, three monohulls were tied up to the concrete wall.  We decided the concrete wouldn’t do us any favors so we anchored out in the lagoon (all by ourselves).  The top photo shows the main doc and the bottom image is the abandoned marina.

Dock and Marina at Hao

Dock and Marina at Hao

We’ve enjoyed some gorgeous sunsets in our private lagoon.  The top photo is from land looking out of the lagoon and the bottom is a sunset photo taken from Sugar Shack.

Sunsets at Hao

Sunsets at Hao

Passage Details

Departed Taravai in the Gambiers Archipelago Saturday, 18 May at 1030am

Arrived Hao in the Tuamotus Archipelago on Wednesday, 22 May at 0530am

Miles Traveled 460nm

Max speed 8.7

Average speed 5.0

We had two days of no wind and had to motor, but then we had two days of light wind and were actually able to pull up full sails.